Frequently Asked Questions

Queen's Maternity Services

No, but it is highly recommended to pre-register with Admitting during your pregnancy. Pre-registering will make your day of admission go much smoother. Pre-registering can be done over the phone at 691-4321, or in person at the Admitting Office located on the first floor of the hospital, or online.

 

No. The maternity tour, Lamaze class and Understanding Birth & Babies Class are offered for your convenience and are not required to have your baby at Queen’s.

 

After checking with your doctor, call Labor & Delivery at 691-4227 to notify them when you are on your way to the hospital. Go directly to the Labor & Delivery unit located in on the 10th floor in Queen Emma Tower. When coming to the hospital during labor, enter through the front lobby between 5 am and 8 pm. During 8 pm and 5 am, use the hospital entrance in the Emergency Department. Wheelchairs are available at both entrances for your convenience.

 

Partners, support adults and children are welcome at any time in the delivery room. All children must be accompanied by an adult responsible for them, other than the delivering mother. If young children will be present during labor and delivery, we suggest that you prepare them in advance for what they will experience.

Is my partner allowed to stay the night?

 

Each of our private postparturm rooms has a chair bed (including bedding) for one adult support person to stay overnight. Children are not allowed to sleep overnight in the hospital.

 

Yes. To promote positive bonding, successful breastfeeding, and to prepare you for caring for your baby at home, we recommend that you keep your baby with you during your stay. Our skilled nursing staff will help you care for your baby, answer your questions, and assist you in becoming comfortable with the care of your newborn.

 

Children are welcome at any time during labor and delivery, if accompanied by an adult responsible for them, other than the delivering mother.

 

Partners, support adults and children are welcome in Labor & Delivery unit at any time. In the Postpartum unit, all family and friends are welcome during the visiting hours of 10 am and 8 pm daily.

 


Breastfeeding

Babies who are nursing well and getting enough milk are:

  • Sucking actively for 10-20 minutes on each breast and act satisfied after a feeding
  • Swallowing during the feeding
  • Nursing 8 to 12 times every 24 hours, during the day and night
  • Having wet diapers and stools as follows:
    • 1 stool and 1 wet diaper during the first day
    • 2 to 3 stools and 2 to 3 wet diapers per day in the first 2-3 days of age
    • 3 stools and at least 6 wet diapers per day after 4 days of age (Stools are at least the size of a quarter)
  • Regaining their birth weight by 10 to 14 days of age.

It is important to have close follow up with your baby’s doctor to monitor your baby’s progress and weight gain. If you think your baby is not nursing well, please call us and your baby’s doctor for help.

 

 

The best way to prevent and cure sore nipples is to make sure baby opens his mouth wide and pull him onto your breast so close that his nose and chin are touching your breast. Your nipples may get sore if baby does not take a big mouthful of breast. Also:

  • Do not use soap on your nipples.
  • To take baby off your breast, first break the suction by putting a clean finger between his lips and your breast.
  • Use a different position each feeding. Alternate between the football hold, lying down and holding the baby next to your tummy.
  • If your nipples are sore: put some lanolin cream on the nipples after feeds. It's safe for your baby so there's no need to remove it when you are ready to feed again.
  • Be patient. With good positioning and time, your nipples will feel better in a few days. If not, please refer to the resources provided below.

 

 

  • Feed your baby every 1 1/2 to 2 hours. It is okay to wake your baby up and offer him the breast. Avoid giving your baby any bottles. The more your baby nurses, the more comfortable you will be.
  • If your breasts are so full that your baby cannot latch on, take one or two minutes to squeeze some milk out with your fingers. This will soften the area behind the nipple so your baby can latch on. Do this right before feeding your baby. For some women, this is easier to do in a warm shower.
  • If your baby cannot latch onto your breast, please call us at 808.691.4213, for help.
  • The fullness will go away in about 1 week, but you will still have plenty of milk as long as your baby is nursing every 3 hours or more often.

*References: Biancuzzo, Marie, Breastfeeding the Newborn, Clinical Strategies for Nurses, 2003, pp 164-165, 335-334. Lawrence, Ruth A. and Robert M Lawrence, Breastfeeding, A Guide for the Medical Profession, 2005, p. 310.

Counseling

The first weeks of breastfeeding can be full of challenges. Be patient with yourself and your baby as you both learn this new skill. If you have any questions or concerns, please call your doctor or one of the resources below:

  1. Breastfeeding Support at The Queen's Medical Center
  2. Hawai’i Mothers' Milk
  3. La Leche League
  4. WIC
  5. IBCLC Lactation Consultants
  6. National Breastfeeding Helpline

The Birth Certificate and Related Issues

Congratulations on your expected delivery! There may be questions you have regarding the registration and birth certificate process. This guide is designed to inform you of issues you may not be aware of. Every newborn is required by law, to be registered with the Hawai’i State Department of Health through a birth certificate. Forms will be provided after your delivery, for you to complete during your hospital stay. You may also be required to complete additional forms, depending on your marital situation at the time.

Every patient who delivers a newborn, needs to complete the Official Birth Certificate form. This is the form that establishes the information for the official certification.

If you are married and your husband is your baby's natural father, you will only need to complete the “Worksheet for Official Birth Certificate."

According to Hawai’i Revised Statutes (HRS), a mother is considered "legally single" if she has never been married or has been legally divorced for more than 300 days before the birth of the baby. If you are considered legally "single," you and your baby's father have the choice to acknowledge paternity (having the baby's natural father's information on the birth certificate). If you both choose to acknowledge paternity, both of you will be required to complete a form titled Voluntary Establishment of Paternity (VEP). In order to complete this form at the hospital, both partners will need a valid picture identification (I.D.). Acceptable I.D.'s are: U.S. driver's license, U.S. State I.D.'s, U.S. Military, or U.S. Government, with proof of Social Security, and by appointment, will need to both be present in witness of a designated hospital employee. If you or your baby's father are not United States Citizens, do not have a Social Security number or proof of it, or an I.D., you will not be able to establish paternity at the hospital, and will have to make an appointment with the Hawai’i State Department of Health. Also, if you and your baby's father will not be able to establish paternity at the hospital for any reason, you will also need to make an appointment with the Hawai’i State Department of Health, to complete the VEP process.

If you are not sure of who your baby's natural father is, it is highly encouraged that you do not establish paternity until you and your partner definitely know who may be the father, and are not obligated to list anyone. An acknowledgement of paternity may be very difficult if not impossible, to rescind once it is established, regardless if it is discovered at a later time, that the person is not the natural father.

According to Hawai’i Revised Statutes (HRS), a mother who is not legally divorced for more than 300 days before the birth of her baby (300 days has not passed since her final divorce date), cannot establish paternity at the time of birth. If she and the baby's natural father want to establish the natural father's information on the birth certificate, they must do so through family court. They may either contact an attorney or family court to proceed with establishing paternity. The hospital does not have the legal authority or forms to process these cases. Because the mother was or is still legally married at the time of conception, HRS assumes that her ex-husband or legal husband is the natural father. To keep her ex-husband's or husband's information off the birth certificate because he is not the father, she will need to complete a form titled "Mother's Refusal to Disclose Information." Once the court acknowledges paternity, they will submit the court order to the Hawai’i State Department of Health, who will then enter the baby's natural father's information on the birth certificate.

Yes. The law now states that parent(s) may give their baby a last name of their choice. For single mothers who establish paternity, both partners will need to agree on a last name when completing the VEP. Do I Have to Name My Baby in Full Before I Leave the Hospital? No. If you are not ready with a full name before you leave the hospital, do not enter a name at all. In these instances, the Hawai’i State Department of Health will mail you a name form on which you may enter your baby's name. Upon receiving your name form, the department will then enter your baby's name on to the birth certificate. If you partially enter a name on the birth certificate, it will be processed as a full name, and to add or change it later, will be a legal name change with the Lt. Governor's Office.

No. If you are not ready with a full name before you leave the hospital, do not enter a name at all. In these instances, the Hawai’i State Department of Health will mail you a name form on which you may enter your baby's name. Upon receiving your name form, the department will then enter your baby's name on to the birth certificate. If you partially enter a name on the birth certificate, it will be processed as a full name, and to add or change it later, will be a legal name change with the Lt. Governor's Office.

Should you and your baby's natural father get married before the birth of the baby, the registration and birth certificate will be treated as that of a married couple and paternity will not have to be filed separately. In this case, you will be considered "married" and your baby's father or husband will be considered the "father" and his information will be on the birth certificate without having to go through family court.

Social Security may be requested for via the birth certificate if parents option for this. The information you provide for the birth certificate is forwarded to the Hawai’i State Department of Health, who then makes a copy of the information, and mails it to the Social Security Administration. If Social Security is requested via the birth certificate, it may take as long as 3 to 4 months before you receive the actual number and card from Social Security. The hospital does not work directly with Social Security or have Social Security applications. (If parents choose to request for Social Security via the birth certificate process, it is not guaranteed by the hospital. The hospital is unable to follow up on Social Security status or make any corrections, should there be a need to.) Social Security cannot be requested via the birth certificate if your baby is unnamed, or for multiple births such as twins or triplets. If you will be submitting your baby's name with the Hawai’i State Department of Health at a later time, you will need to apply for Social Security on your own. A name first need to be established before anyone can apply for Social Security. For multiple births, Social Security Administration require that parents apply for it separately on their own, to avoid the issuance of consecutive numbers.